Saturday, 18 September 2021

The Goyt Valley

Our next meeting on Tuesday 5th October features a video presentation from David Stirling.  This history of the Goyt Valley includes numerous photographs taken both before and after creation of the reservoirs. 

We meet at Furness Vale Community Centre, Yeardsley Lane at 7.30pm. Doors open at 7.0.  Admission is just £2 including refreshments. Non members are always welcome.

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Sunday, 12 September 2021

Forthcoming Events

The first meeting of our new season was very successful when we were entertained by ex Tiller Girl, Bez Cooper. 

We are in the process of booking speakers for the coming year and have an interesting programme to look forward to. 

Please note that existing memberships continue to be valid until our AGM in March 2022.


Saturday, 28 August 2021

Memories of Bridgemont

 

 Our latest publication tells of recollections from our neighbouring village.

Bridgemont is a small village midway between Whaley Bridge and Furness Vale in Derbyshire.  Sheila Harling born in 1931 and Les Jones born in 1944 relate their memories of growing up and living in the village. Their stories are supplimented with many photographs and other information from the archives of Furness Vale History Society.  The 44 pages include many illustrations.

Copies are available from the History Society, the Community shop and from our online shop:  https://etsy.me/3ztcplz

An ebook version is now on sale from Amazon Kindle:  https://amzn.to/3yz1hm8


 

 

Thursday, 12 August 2021

My Life As A Tiller Girl

 We are delighted to announce our first meeting since March 2020. 

Bez Cooper left school in Manchester at the age of 15 to become a Tiller Girl.  In her illustrated talk on Tuesday September 7th, she tells of her life on stage and behind the scenes. We will also hear the history of the Tiller Girls,  founded in Manchester in 1890 by John Tiller,  and how they went on to become a world famous dance troupe. 

Our meetings are held at Furness Vale Community Centre, Yeardsley Lane, Furness Vale SK23 7PN.  Admission is £2 for non-members.  Doors open at 7.0pm for a 7.30 start.

We look  forward to welcoming, our members and friends.



                                                                John Tiller



Saturday, 7 August 2021

Bank End and Shirt's Row

 

The 1871 census lists Bank End Cottages as "Shirt's Row". This appears to be named after James Shirt one of the residents who is listed as "Stone Dealer and Master Mason employing 25 hands" . He was the owner of Bank End Quarry and his was perhaps the largest house at the far end of the row..
Also living at Shirts Row were 4 labourers at the stone quarry and also Alfred Taylor, a Master Wheelwright employing 2 men.  Alfred Bennett was an apprentice Joiner and Wheelwright at the same address.
Philip Henry Webb was a Manufacturer of Cotton Yarns.

On 21st January 1871, the Glossopdale Chronicle told how James Shirt had entertained his employees at theri annual dinner.


Bank End Farm is first recorded in 1611. 

In the 1871 Census it was occupied by Thomas Ollerenshaw aged 32, and his family, and by Edward Ollerenshaw, aged 29, and his family. They were perhaps brothers or cousins. Morris's Trade Directory of 1874 lists them as also being grocers and provision dealers.
William Ollerenshaw, was also living at Bank End Farm,he was retired, aged 58.


Also giving their address as Bank End was Edward Ollerenshaw a retired farmer aged 74, his wife, and son, aged 46
Joseph Longden whose grocery business was at 55 Buxton Road lived at Bank End with his wife as did Samuel Cooper, a Bricklayer

 From the 1871 Census 

 

59

8

33

Bank End

LONGDEN

Joseph

Head

Mar

55

-

Grocer

DBY

Peak Forest

59

8

33

-

LONGDEN

Sarah Ann

Wife

Mar

-

37

-

DBY

New Mills

59

8

33

-

PIMLETT

Elizabeth

-

Unm

-

30

School Teacher

LAN

Manchester

59

8

34

Bank End

COOPER

Samuel

Head

Mar

48

-

Lab. Bricklayer

LAN

Manchester

59

8

34

-

COOPER

Mary

Wife

Mar

-

46

-

CHS

Stockport

59

8

34

-

COOPER

Jane

Dau

Unm

-

18

Cotton Weaver

CHS

Duckenfield

59

8

34

-

COOPER

Mary Ellen

Dau

-

-

14

Cotton Weaver

CHS

Duckenfield

59

8

35

Bank End

OLLERENSHAW

Edward

Head

Mar

74

-

Retired Farmer

DBY

Whaley Bridge

59

8

35

-

OLLERENSHAW

Elizabeth

Wife

Mar

-

75

-

DBY

Hayfield

59

8

35

-

OLLERENSHAW

Edward

Son

-

46

-

Farm lab.

CHS

Disley

















































































Folio

Page

Schedule

Address

Surname

Forenames

Rel to Head

Mar Cond

Age Male

Age Female

Occupation

Born County

Place

64

17

70

Bank End Farm

OLLERENSHAW

Thomas    

Head

Mar

32

-

Farmer of 50 acres

CHS

Lyme Handley

64

17

70

-

OLLERENSHAW

Prudence

Wife

Mar

-

30

-

CHS

Adlington

64

17

70

-

OLLERENSHAW

William

Son

-

9

-

Scholar

DBY

Mellor

64

17

70

-

OLLERENSHAW

John

Son

-

6

-

Scholar

DBY

Mellor

64

17

70

-

OLLERENSHAW

Thomas

Son

-

4

-

-

DBY

Mellor

64

17

70

-

OLLERENSHAW

William

Boarder

Unm

58

-

Retired Farmer

CHS

Whaley

64

17

71

Bank End Farm

OLLERENSHAW

Edward

Head

Mar

29

-

Farmer of 35 acres

CHS

Lyme Handley

64

17

71

-

OLLERENSHAW

Betty

Wife

Mar

-

29

-

DBY

Hayfield

64

17

71

-

OLLERENSHAW

George

Son

-

5

-

-

DBY

Hayfield

64

17

71

-

OLLERENSHAW

John

Son

-

2

-

-

CHS

Disley

64

17

71

-

OLLERENSHAW

Edward

Son

-

3months

-

-

CHS

Disley

64

17

72

Shirts Row

SHIRT

James

Head

Mar

68

-

Stone Dealer & Master Mason Emp 25 Hands

DBY

Chapel en le Frith

64

17

72

-

SHIRT

Eliza

Wife

Mar

-

62

-

CHS

Frodsham

64

17

72

-

FURNIVAL

Mary Grice

Visitor

Unm

-

43

Seamstress

LAN

Warrington

64

17

73

Shirts Row

BRIDGE

Solomon

Head

Mar

26

-

Labourer (Stone Quarry)

DBY

Thornsett

64

17

73

-

BRIDGE

Sarah

Wife

Mar

-

29

-

CHS

High lane

64

18

74

Shirts Row

BENNETT

James                 

Head

Mar

56

-

Labourer Stone Quarry

DBY

Sparrow pit

64

18

74

-                        

BENNETT            

 Ann     

Dau

Unm

-             

29

Cotton spinner

CHS

Disley

64

18

74

-

BENNETT

Elizabeth

Dau

Unm

-

27

Housemaid

DBY

Whittle

64

18

74

-

BENNETT

James

Son

Unm

23

-

Lab. Stone quarry

DBY

Whittle

64

18

74

-

BENNETT

John

Son

Unm

17

-

Lab. Stone quarry

DBY

Whittle

64

18

74

-

BENNETT

Harriett

Dau

-

-

15

Cotton Weaver

CHS

Whaley

64

18

74

-

BENNETT

Martha

Dau

-

-

13

Scholar

CHS

Disley

64

18

75

Shirts  Row

TAYLOR

Alfred

Head

Mar

34

-

Master Wheelwright Emp. 2 men

LAN

Manchester

64

18

75

-

TAYLOR

Mary

Wife

Mar

-

38

-

LAN

Lancaster

64

18

75

-

TAYLOR

Lucy

Dau

-

-

9

Scholar

DBY

Chapel en le Frith

64

18

75

-

TAYLOR

Maria

Dau

-

-

8

Scholar

DBY

Chapel en le Frith

64

18

75

-

TAYLOR

Samuel

Son

-

6

-

Scholar

DBY

Chapel en le Frith

64

18

75

-

TAYLOR

George

Son

-

4

-

-

CHS

-

64

18

75

-

BENNETT

Alfred

Apprent

Unm

20

-

Joiner & Wheelwright

DBY

Hope

64

18

-

Shirts Row

2 Uninhabited

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

64

18

76

Shirts Row

WEBB

Philip Henry

Head

Mar

32

-

Manufacturer of Cotton Yarns

CHS

Frodsham

64

18

76

-

WEBB

Frances

Wife

Mar

-

39

-

DEN

Wrexham

64

18

76

-

WEBB

Martha Beatrice

Dau

-

-

7

-

CHS

Disley

64

18

76

-

WEBB

Jas. Henry P.

Son

-

5

-

-

CHS

Disley

64

18

76

-

WRIGHT

Annie

Servant

Unm

-

21

Domestic Servant

CHS

Tarporley

Friday, 11 June 2021

Number Please

 Here is an extract listing all local subscribers from the 1911 directory of the National Telephone Company.  The company was formed in 1881 and through the last years of the century amalgamated with many regional service providers until they held a national monopoly. The Telephone Transfer Act of 1911 nationalised the company and it was absorbed into the GPO in 1912. 




Friday, 28 May 2021

An impression of the Garage

 We have created a 3D computer model of the garage on Buxton Road as it appeared in the 1960s. The model includes the adjoining row of cottages. 


 We don't know the age of this building. It does appear on the 1909 Ordnance Survey map but is probably much older. There was a motor garage here as early as 1927, advertised by McCabe and Jacklin.  It is believed that the premises were originally the stables for the Beard and Bugsworth Colliery (Lady Pit) which was at the start of Dolly Lane. The mine closed in 1903.  It is known that an office was maintained in the row of cottages adjacent to the garage and this was sometimes known as “Office Row” The cottage at the far end had a small window looking out on to Yeardsley Lane and here, employees would collect their wages of a Friday evening.

The garage was advertised for sale in 1930 and the next owner appears to have been Cyril W. Milk. In 1941 Johnson and Hockmeyer were trading as Furness Garage Ltd and its final owners were the Start Motor Company.  

1927 advertisement

In 1984 Simon Naden, trading as Timbercraft  moved from Bridgemont and converted the building to a furniture workshop and showroom. He appears to have stayed until 1992 when there were planning applications to rebuild the site as a garage workshop with offices above.  A further application in 2004 proposed building 5 flats on the site.  None of these plans came to fruition and in 2009 Derbyshire Green Energy took over the premises from where they traded until 2012 when it was advertised for sale. 


 The next occupants were “The Cake Nest”  a bakery business which had been established at the owner’s home in Buxworth. Much of their trade was by internet and in October 2015 they moved to Calico Lane.

North West Motor Cycles took over the premises in September 2016 additionally they sold used cars. A small grocery shop “Violets Emporium” opened selling essentials, sweets, hot and cold drinks and snacks. Another part of the shop sold second hand goods.  Short lived, the shop closed on 7th April 2017. The title North West Motor Cycles disappeared shortly after opening. The next brief occupant was "Verdebris", an antique dealer and restorer. Used cars continued to be sold on the forecourt by Tony Hanson.

Now looking abandoned and uncared for, the premises is on the market. 





Thursday, 20 May 2021

Andrea Barlow's reminiscences

Andrea Barlow, updated May 2021

Photographed on Marsh Lane where her aunt lived, Andrea is the young girl at the front of the cart.  Also in the picture are an old aunt, Millie from Rochdale who was brilliant at
monologues,  her Dad,  and behind , Bertha, Aunt Millie's friend,who her parents did not want as a child. They wanted her back when she worked , Aunt put a Stop to that, so she became much loved to our family.

 When I lived in Furness Vale from 1953, it was great. We played out without fear, there were very few who had cars.
I can remember the big old house down Station Road. Two ladies lived in the back bit, I think, maybe sisters. A friend of mine years ago,  said how elegent it was before they had it,an actress had it and she said there was stunning wallpaper with pansies on and and l know it had a beautiful staircase.  The ladies caught us in there but it was OK. There were hundreds of letters with lovely stamps on. They gave us lots, but not the letters. I saw my first kingfisher there, where there was a tunnel.
I had a pony and Trap when l was 10 in 1956, it was lovely, he didn't like the bit where J. J. Jackson's butchers was, he backed up and nobody could get out the shop.
A couple of weeks ago, there were pictures from over by St. John's Church. My mother in law lived in one of the council houses, then Bank End Farm. Fletcher's family, then Charlie Hall the vet bought it. There was the Bank End cottages and above that a huge house, lovely place, can't for the life of me recall its name,  could have been ....knowel???  My mum went to Brownies with her sister, that would be about 1932. I think sisters lived there, they were quite well to do ladies.
There was a really nice cafe where Ernest Davis had a beautiful bread shop. l can smell it now. Mum waited on for spending money about age 13, so that would be about 1935. It was a nice cafe that travellers would stop and sit in. A favourite was a big ham salad and fancy cakes, very popular. I believe it could be the antique shop now.

Mum having her hairdressers at 264 Buxton had a lot of customers she went to Furness Vale School with, and l grew up knowing those special village people and their families that  .followed. lt wasnt just to get hair done, it was a place to share personal things and was something that lasted so many years.l think  Mum knew al ot of the locals private lives, that she kept locked up in her heart. Some were Mother's of her school friends and a few had a free hair do as they were so hard up, having husband's who liked the pub a little too much, it was the mum's had to go without. A tin of salmon was absolute luxury, l know mum would put a tin in one ladies bag for a treat, or a quarter of tea. Life for a lot was hard in Furness Vale, but people always tried to help where they could.
We played in front of Ernie Davis bread shop.The fun of going to Mr Dick Scofield's shop,  Mr Bert Heap at the iron mongers, Miss Wild and Mrs Alexander at the wool shop. A great post office; the paper shop, John Smalley and was and Amy his wife. The Co-op was great, you got to weigh what you wanted; you could even get hen corn. Then Harry and Amy Moorcroft came as butchers ,they were pure gold , he was at school with Mum.

264 and 266 Buxton Road and the hairdresser's shop between. A computer generated reconstruction

The antique shop at 95 Buxton Road, formerly Ernie Davis's "Cafe" and bakers shop


I lived in Furness Vale and was Christened at At Johns Church in1946. I lived in Whaley Bridge,then Newtown .l was in Furness Vale from 7 years old and left to go to a village just out side Matlock in1970 ..My Mother and my husband both went to Furness Vale school and my Daughter was there for a couple of years.l went to New town school as we had live there,l stayed there until it was time to go to secondary school. Furness Vale was full of village charecters.of which there couldn't possibly be the like of them today.
The COOP was great a real hive of activities ,l had chickens you could go and get corn in there,as you just bought what you wanted. There was the chippy at the back of the green grocers Mr the Soldier Dick pub
Across the RD was Mr J Jacksons butchers then it changed to very special friends of mine,Mr arms Harry Moorcroft.Mr Heap iron mongers etc Mr Scocroft,m then John Smalley's news agents Mrs Hills toffee shop all the kids could get CIGs in odd ones,The post office. Then going towards New town Ernie Davis bread and cakes,it was beautiful bread.it is now as far as l know Antiques ,my aAuntie lived next door and next was the Bank inthe house next door.It only opened Tues and Friday if l remember right. Oh and lve forgotten before the news agents The Two sister Miss wild and Mrs Ale xandra at the Wool shop, and.lt was fun then ,so much atmosphere ..
Every one knew each other.
I think it was Late 80 s when l was last there and it all seemed strange as all l knew had gone.Like every thing things move on not always for the better but that's life.
I have now lived in Cornwall 15 years,,its like Derbyshire but with the sea,a slow pace of life.My Birthplace was Buxton and l still have memories ,it's beautiful.
❤️. IT always will, I'm enjoying the Furness vale and Whaley Bridge sites Thank you
 
 
l lived at 264 Buxton road my mum Jean had a hair dressers at a little shop at the side of the house.Thats gone now it was pulled down.years before mum had the shop it was a millinery shop two sisters. My Dad Fred,was manager at New mills Co,op shoe dept and Chapel en le Frith. Our Surname was COLLIER. My Auntie ADA VASS lived in the house in the middle of Ernie's bread shop and the Bank. lwent to Newtown school then a school at Great moor Stockport then Chapel school. You may have known Ken Barlow l married him in 1972 ,he had another Tom and sister Agnes. Ken started his work life at Diglee Farm up yeardsley lane right at the very top.Mrs Dorothy Hill and Jackthey had a son John.
Ken loved his 17 years there and we always visited when coming to FV to visit Ken's Mum Agnes the best Mother in law possible.
Ken died 10 years ago with severe Dementia My Mum died in 6 years ago ,also with Dementia ,living hell. Ken would have been 95 now.
Well it's lovely to know Vera that you knew some people l did l remember Barbara Dean,she was lovely. Thank you for your time Vera l m so pleased to have news.lcould just eat some of Ernie Davis bread,it was so good. Thank you. Andrea.